WHAT READERS ARE SAYING

Have you read Paper Boats? Did you love it?! Share your experience on Goodreads and Amazon today!

"I decided to 'LOVE' this novel because it is both fresh and compelling in a way few novels are. The book is fresh in that it looks at the end phase of WWII in Berlin through the eyes of two young boys and through their experiences with the people they meet. The author's narrative gift is what makes the telling so compelling. It took me a few pages to 'recalibrate' to the world of the young Jewish slave, Otto; to his view of the world; and to the 'sort of' German syntax of some of his sentences. Once I had done that, the pace of the story had me hooked. I wanted to follow Otto on his missions as a courier for the NAZI governmental elite, now holding out in the infamous bunker in Berlin as the Russians overrun the city. Through Otto's eyes we see both bestial and sympathetic denizens of the bunker in those final days. We learn Otto's 'back story' of being first herded into a ghetto with his family and neighbors and then being passed on to a Polish extermination camp. Otto has more than 'nine lives' and more speed and nimbleness than a cat: his missions are always hair-raising and suspenseful. Finally, he is given a mission by Adolf Hitler himself to take an incendiary document detailing complicity in 'The Final Solution' from the bunker to Admiral Donitz, Hitler's choice to succeed him as head of the German state. Martin Borman, Otto's initial link with his courier job, belatedly realizes that he cannot afford to let Otto be successful. Borman attaches Joseph Kessel, a devoted member of the Hitler Youth to the mission. Then he sends an assassination kommando to liquidate one or both of them. Most of the tale deals with the boys' run through war-ravaged Germany into Poland in search of the truth about the death camps and in search of whether Otto's parents or his childhood friend Annie have survived. The Nazi-oriented Hitler Youth and Otto make an unlikely alliance, full of friction, and their unfolding story is told with a good deal of irony as well as with believable development. We come to feel that young people, whether they were in the Hitler Youth movement or were Jewish or were 'whatever' will remake the German world in the post-NAZI era. In the end, I felt that the author's researches and fictive reconstruction of this little known period in the war left me with a deeper understanding of life in Germany and Poland in that brief span of time. Erndell Scott has written a story that will 'stay with you.'"

 

  - Jim Ellsworth, Amazon Reviewer

Charlottesville, VA

This book was quite frankly...captivating. I picked this book based on my interest in WWII history as the backdrop for this story. Erndell Scott did a fantastic job of keeping you on the edge of your seat and the rollercoaster ride of emotions was most impressive. As you place yourself in the shoes of Otto, the main character, you question "How would I handle this situation, what would I do?" You really "feel" Otto's range of emotions from ultimate despair to emphatic joy as he experiences life changing decisions on each and every page.

  - Amazon Reviewer

"I must admit, I’m not a history buff. Books about war, and even books written in the shadow of wars tend to bore me to sleep. War books generally drag on and on, are pretty mundane, and are downright boring to read. Going into reading Paper Boats, I thought that the book would be a snooze fest. I was pleasantly surprised that it wasn’t. Paper Boats is not your typical war story at all! I found myself engrossed in the story from beginning to end. I couldn’t wait to read the next page to find out what would happen next. I developed a strong interest for the setting of the book, the situations found in the book, and the characters found in the book. The last time I was this engrossed by reading a book with such strong historical content was when I read the Diary Of Anne Frank

In a lot of ways, Paper Boats reminded me of the Diary Of Anne Frank. I cared about the character of Otto in the book. I cried right alongside him. I felt like I could feel the things that Otto was feeling. I was eager to find out if Otto survived and what his life was like. The book was very well researched about the events surrounding World War II and the Third Reich. There were so many things in this book that you don’t find in history books and movies, things that you can only learn about if you look at the personal, human side of the story

The book takes place at the end of the Third Reich in Berlin during World War II. It’s the tale of two nine year old boys, completely different in all aspects, and how the events of the war and their differences bring them together during a time when the world was being split apart. Otto is nothing more than a Jewish boy who wants to find his place in the world and feel like there is some sort of normalcy in his life, even in the middle of a war. He longs for the acceptance and respect of people around him. Growing up in the shadow of World War II proves to be challenging as he’s faced with issues that children should not have to deal with. His suffering, his struggles, it’s all related to the war, and it’s all taking it’s toll on this little boy who just wants to be a regular nine year old kid

I found myself emotionally invested in this book. Waiting on pins and needles for what was to come, and quickly reading page after page with a great deal of anticipation. In the end, it’s a historical book about war, combined with a soap opera style drama that combine into one wonderful, intriguing read

I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for an honest review."

  -Bridget Mattson, Amazon Reviewer

I finished reading Paper Boats over a week ago, and Otto remains in my mind and heart. Even though the story is placed in the end of WWII, this is a account of a young boy’s journey having to do very strategic things to survive. The tenet of this wonderful story is Otto’s resilience and failure to become hardened in spirit as he witnesses war at its harshest. Otto does not become cynical and continues to see the best in people in spite of their bigotry towards him. I found myself cheering for Otto along every twist and turn in this adventure.

The author’s writing is crisp, moving, poetic, dramatic and keeps you yearning for more. I was hooked from the first page and can imagine Paper Boats as a movie. I am hooked on Mr. Scott’s novel and hope he will continue to write more era novels. I never knew I could “enjoy” a story in the midst of atrocities; but Otto, his relationships and journey give faith to all that we can overcome obstacles and maintain our sensibilities through the blameless eyes of a child.

  - Alexander Brennan, Amazon Reviewer

"Paper boats is a gem of a book. Centered around the end of the Third Reich, it tells the story of the closing of the war through its protagonist - a young Jewish boy, Otto. Otto endears himself to the reader as he goes through many gripping experiences and we learn about his inner and outer journey. The author does an amazing job of creating a vivid world that completely draws us in as though it's happening in real time. The books makes us cry, laugh and feel pangs of nostalgia as we root for Otto. A must read but a word of caution - you won't be able to put it down until you know what happens to Otto!"

- Simmi Goyle, Physician

Los Angeles, CA

"A spellbinding story of survival revealed one moment at a time. An amazing journey of unspeakable horrors blanketed with decades 

of enduring love and pride - 'My name is Otto Kaufmann, son of Solomon Kaufmann'."

 

- Melissa Wallace, Grandmother

Cleveland, OH

"A riveting telling about a young man in very dark times. An experience of courage, survival and love. I didn't want to put it down as it drew me closer and closer to Otto, one page at a time.”  

 

- Melina Margileth, Mother

Del Mar, CA​

"I didn't want to put my kindle down because I didn't want to leave Otto alone."

 

  - Kimberly Minsk, Mother

Richmond, VA

"Reading this book transported me to another time and place. A place I wouldn't choose to go to. But meeting Otto you immediately want to go on this journey with him. He is a ray of hope in an otherwise darkened world. And watching his relationship with the, by contrast, much angrier and hate filled Joseph is fascinating. As a reader you wonder who will impact who more? As they journey into this heart of darkness will Otto and his inherently optimistic attitude in the face of utter despair win over the confused and angry Joseph? The readers journey in Paper Boats is a complex exploration of humanity in its many forms. And getting to take that journey with Otto is the true reward."

- Emily Barrow, Film Producer

Florida

"Erndell Scott's writing captivates the reader who becomes Otto's companion as he struggles to survive the horrors of war and learns that despite the atrocities, acceptance, compassion, camaraderie and love exist even in those souls we oppose. Otto's experience is relevant in our own lives as well, as each of us navigate the complexities of life seeking enduring friendship and joys as simple as sailing paper boats."  

 

 

- Megan Rosende, Defense Contractor Scottsdale, AZ

"This is an absolutely gripping story that is written so clearly that the history and characters come alive in the telling.”  

 

 

  - Carolyn Harris

Jericho, VT

"World War II was a monumental war for the world’s history. Many laws, procedures, medical discoveries and blocks, films, books, families, and products are still affected by it today. It was a very rough time for the world and for human kind, period. Millions of soldiers and innocent people lost their lives, cities were shattered beyond recognition from air raids and grenades, and trust between loved ones were compromised at the time in order for us to be here today. I recently finished the WWII Historical Fiction novel entitled “Paper Boats” by Erndell Scott. Throughout it’s contents, I was reminded of those times and was transported into Berlin, Germany, close to the end of the war.

 

The novel follows the personal journeys of two young boys, Otto Kaufmann and Joseph Kessler. Otto, a nine-year-old Jewish slave/official courier to a Nazi , fights his way through closing war while being sent out to complete tasks made by his master, placing him into dangerous situations from his surroundings and his assignments. Joseph, on the other hand, is a Hitler youth. Raised to praise his leader and must also embark on a dangerous mission with Otto. They both rush into the hell of war in order to fulfill one final mission from Adolf Hitler. The author’s visuals of war are all intrusive and too overwhelming real at times but that is what made the story all the more enjoyable. You literally feel as if you are running right beside Otto dodging bombs, escaping land mines, and searching for freedom. Now, I have read plenty of historical fiction books but up to now none have had the ability to throw readers in so deep into the action that you feel yourself drowning in it before you realize what you’ve gotten yourself into. This book is that intense, especially being told mainly from a child’s perspective.

 

Otto’s story is unutterably heart-breaking to watch unfold. In the beginning of the story, he reflects in the early days of the war when he and his friend Annie, would play with their sail boats. Simpler times. Times when war wasn’t breaking down his home around him. The scene painted is almost like a metaphor for what was to come into his life. The edges of his boat or life would get soaked by the water and eventually fall apart. He’d constantly try to rebuild a proper one over and over again. But all would remain in the end were bits of paper. Much like many Jewish survivors in the war. Tiny bits of their former lives remain, but the darkness of the war, persecution, sights, and terrors have overtaken the majority of their souls.

 

The tying of the two boys, however, shows the vast difference of the teachings between two people yet they were from the same country. The book shows the struggle of the separation of their people, only to realize they need one another in order to survive. After all, we are all people trying to live."

 

 

"World War II was a monumental war for the world’s history. Many laws, procedures, medical discoveries and blocks, films, books, families, and products are still affected by it today. It was a very rough time for the world and for human kind, period. Millions of soldiers and innocent people lost their lives, cities were shattered beyond recognition from air raids and grenades, and trust between loved ones were compromised at the time in order for us to be here today. I recently finished the WWII Historical Fiction novel entitled “Paper Boats” by Erndell Scott. Throughout it’s contents, I was reminded of those times and was transported into Berlin, Germany, close to the end of the war.

 

The novel follows the personal journeys of two young boys, Otto Kaufmann and Joseph Kessler. Otto, a nine-year-old Jewish slave/official courier to a Nazi , fights his way through closing war while being sent out to complete tasks made by his master, placing him into dangerous situations from his surroundings and his assignments. Joseph, on the other hand, is a Hitler youth. Raised to praise his leader and must also embark on a dangerous mission with Otto. They both rush into the hell of war in order to fulfill one final mission from Adolf Hitler. The author’s visuals of war are all intrusive and too overwhelming real at times but that is what made the story all the more enjoyable. You literally feel as if you are running right beside Otto dodging bombs, escaping land mines, and searching for freedom. Now, I have read plenty of historical fiction books but up to now none have had the ability to throw readers in so deep into the action that you feel yourself drowning in it before you realize what you’ve gotten yourself into. This book is that intense, especially being told mainly from a child’s perspective.

 

Otto’s story is unutterably heart-breaking to watch unfold. In the beginning of the story, he reflects in the early days of the war when he and his friend Annie, would play with their sail boats. Simpler times. Times when war wasn’t breaking down his home around him. The scene painted is almost like a metaphor for what was to come into his life. The edges of his boat or life would get soaked by the water and eventually fall apart. He’d constantly try to rebuild a proper one over and over again. But all would remain in the end were bits of paper. Much like many Jewish survivors in the war. Tiny bits of their former lives remain, but the darkness of the war, persecution, sights, and terrors have overtaken the majority of their souls.

 

The tying of the two boys, however, shows the vast difference of the teachings between two people yet they were from the same country. The book shows the struggle of the separation of their people, only to realize they need one another in order to survive. After all, we are all people trying to live."

 

 

  - Ashleigh, UK, A Frolic Through Fiction